Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Shadow wars tokens



OK, quick one for today. I've recently played a mordheim campaign and i'm about to play a Shadow Wars one and an Inquisimunda one. There's one thing I've learnt so far : I don't like placing my models flat on the table.
Why is that ? Paint chips, bent parts, you name them, that's the sort of stuff I don't tolerate anymore given how much time I spend on my models.

Is there a solution for this ? Yes there is. Tokens are one of them.

Now I'll hear a few of you saying "Hey JB, you devilishly handsome SOB, there already are tokens in the box !" and this is true :

Problem is, they do not cover the 2 states requiring you to put your models either on the back or on the belly.
I could just use some ready made of course or even just complete those I have with 2 more states...
I could indeed.
But I didn't.

I wanted something personnal I could use for Mordheim and Necromunda in all its forms (Classic Necro, Inquisimunda or Shadow Wars).

That's why I first picked 25mm round plastci bases from Renedra (these cost under 5€ so not exactly a bit purchase here).



Then designed the motives I wanted on my tokens. The template with checkers on the rim were done with AutoCAD because I'm a civil engineer and it was the easiest way for me to do that but that's just me.
You can notice I kept things realtively close to the original Shadow Wars tokens to make things easy for other players.
The column on the right was a test and the one on the left was the real deal, weathered a bit to avoid having white dots flashing on the table.


A little scanning and filters afterward, I had a file I could print (you're welcome to use this one if you fancy it btw) :


With everything in hand, I just had to

- prime one side of the bases in black (5 minutes tops)
- Cut all the tokens (30ish minutes while listening to music)
- Glue all the tokens on the bases ( 15 minutes tops)
- paint the edges in black (I used foam to blend the paper and the base together, give a slightly weathered appearance and save time)
- Spray a coat of antishine mat spray

All in all, it was a very quick process and I'm now very happy to have my own tokens and know my models will be a little safer !


16 comments:

  1. While I find the tokens vey clever and simple, I'm not against rolling my models in all positions on the gaming table. Except big Big Guys in Blood Bowl I never not felt this was a problem, gaming or modelling wise.
    Chips are rare and remind me that I need to varnish my models :)

    But this is a very cleverly pack of tokens sir.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do carefully varnish my models but it always happens, plus there are many models you can't really put on teh back of belly simply because the model won't allow it (animals mostly and some weird characters), It's all about being safe rather than sorry really. ^^

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  2. These are great looking and very useful indeed JB. What token denotes what model state out of interest? Kudos to you for having the energy to make these.

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    Replies
    1. If you look at the last pic, from left to right you'd have :
      - hidden
      - overwatch
      - run
      - down
      - broken

      It didn't take much energy honestly, a couple of hours all in all at worse. Longest part being cutting the circles with scissors for half an hour which is bearable.

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    2. What's the one between overwatch and run?

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    3. That would be out of combat. 😊

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  3. Having been reintroduced to wargaming via Warmachine I am more then happy for a table to be scattered in tokens.

    Anything that cuts down on the book keeping is fine with me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never played Warmachine or Hordes but I do like keeping my models in one piece. ^^

      Delete
  4. Your tokens look great. I like the addition of weathering to tone them down a bit on the table. Instead of tokens, I use GW Special Orders dice. I find them easier to pull one out and have six options quickly available rather than locating a specific token from a bag or pile. Google ModCube for a pretty awesome looking custom dice option too.

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    Replies
    1. That's actually a very good idea, maybe a tad more expensive but definitely more convenient I reckon.

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  5. I also hate knocking over my miniatures, so I very much appreciate this post and your how-to.
    (Even worse than knocking over figures, I nearly have a heart attack every time I see someone eat potato chips, Doritos or some other oily food while playing a miniature game).

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    Replies
    1. Gawd, guys with greasy fingers... urgh.

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  6. A hobbyist truly never knew that so much work goes into mere tokens. A man has said. Then again the man doesn't game much. But he has certainly watched too much scenes involving Jaqen H'ghar in Game of Thrones. (Sigh ... lame I know. I can't help myself. Season 7 is upon us). ^_^

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just a couple of hours really so nothing really elaborate !
      Don't be ashamed, we're all waiting ! ^^'

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  7. Also with models in SW:A being on multiple potential scenery levels in-game chances of dings and chips multiply muchly!

    Think I'll look into doing something like this too - thanks for sharing your work mate!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, with 4 games under the belt using those, I'm very pleased of the return on investment really !
      They do not ruin the look of the game and they are a great help while avoiding any potential damage from placing your models in weird positions...

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